Calling 

About 15 years ago, I began to listen to my intuition and to what my soul was calling me to do. I knew I was here to do great things, as we all are. 

It is my belief that we are all here to serve and make a difference in some capacity. Sometimes we get caught up in the thinking that it has to be something grand or famous, but the truth is even the simplest of lives can be the most impactful.  It isn’t about being seen, but rather meek in your actions to create a world that is more peaceful and more full of compassion and unity. 

When I began to get the nudges to look deep inside, I did so without an intention of a return. So often our culture teaches that you give to get. I was certain I was not going to fall into that. Instead, I listen to my gut and lived in a way that served my highest food with zero attachments to an outcome. 

Eventually, I was able to leave my day job (and a dysfunctional relationship) and now I do what I am called to do, and that is share yoga and wellness with people who are living with a disability. I specialize in brain injuries and seniors but I enjoy all types of people and my client base includes a spectrum of abilities and interests. 

My services include adaptive yoga, wellness coaching, essential oil education and level 1 healing touch.  Each day I head off to work I realize that this isn’t work, it is soul. 

Have you found your calling? If  you are still seeking, stop thinking so much and instead try a few of these ideas: 

  • Ask yourself this–“I am best when I am ________”. Be truthful. 
  • Journal about the things that bring you joy. They may be subtle like children laughing, making sure neighbors are taken care of, cooking, nature, laughter, etc. 
  • What are you passionate about and where do you speak up? Sometimes those “triggers” lead you toward something. 
  • Start to identify your everyday actions and interests that could lead you to a life of meaning. Cooking, sharing success with others, natural living, yoga, teaching others a skill, and more. 
  • Practice gratitude.  Just you being you is a worthy adventure. Celebrate who you are by identifying things about yourself you are grateful for. 
  • Stop comparing yourself. Your life journey is yours and yours alone. Remember that when we fall face down, that is often when we come up even stronger. Wipe off your dust and keep at it. 

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Managing Emotions

During times of change it can be extremely challenging to maintain an even keel when it comes to emotions.  Sometimes the change of season can bring up some hidden sorrows or internal commotion. There are thousands of suggestions for managing the changes and the subsequent onslaught of emotions that can come.  Here is a list of my tried and true remedies for those times:

1. Write down your feelings.  Buy yourself a small journal or notebook and spend some time each day writing down what you are feeling.  Often I hear people say that they want to journal but do not know what to put down on paper.  Start with some self-guided questions–what am I resisting in my life today, what are my fears, what brings me joy, or what am I thankful for today? After a few days or weeks it is useful to go back and read what you were feeling and see that even feelings change. That is a good thing.

2. Take a walk. Just get up and move.  A brisk 20-minute walk can do wonders for feelings of sluggishness and sadness.  Getting the blood moving and the fresh air can invigorate your body while clearing out any cobwebs in the mind.  As you walk, take the time to notice the beginnings of nature’s changes and all her glory.  Notice how she easily opens up to the new season through the buddings of leaves and flowers.  Learn from this wise teacher.

3. More than just a good smell. Of our five primary senses, the olfactory is the only one that transmits information directly from the nose into the limbic center of the brain, the seat of emotions and memory. Recent brain scan research has shown that different scents affect brainwave production; for example, with some increasing alpha (relaxation) waves and others affecting beta (alertness) waves. Lavender and lemon both effect serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23524167http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16780969. Depending on my current mood, I choose essential oils as a quick way to alter either sluggishness (peppermint or any citrus oil) or reduce anxious feelings and restlessness (lavender or any tree/root oil). Shop for oils or open a wholesale account here: http://mydoterra.com/staciewyatt

4. Unroll your mat.  If you do not own a yoga mat, no biggie.  Just find a space and bend your body.  Stretch your limbs and BREATHE.  No need to worry about the “right” poses, your body knows exactly what it needs and when you listen, you will know how to bend and how to stretch.  Learning to trust your intuition and offer your body what it needs is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself.

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The Journal Tool

Keeping a journal can be one of the best tools in your mind/body toolbox.  Why?

  • Writing down your thoughts can be a place to purge emotions, judgments and all the yuck in your head that has a hard time leaving.  Your journal entries can be as messy and scribbled as you racing thoughts, and that is okay. What matters is that the thoughts–and often worries–are moved from your internal state to an external state which often leads to release and the clarity.
  •  Reviewing where you have been can foster a sense of growth and accomplishment.  Sometimes reviewing what you were feeling during a certain time period can be refreshing to your current outlook.  I find that reviewing my journal a few times a year grounds me and reminds me of my goals and vision.
  • Taking the time to write down what you are grateful can be a wonderful reminder on those days when you feel hopeless or lost.  Simply seeing that on a previous day what you were grateful for can lift your mood and remind you of your purpose.
  • Begin with intention.  I take my time in choosing my journal for the year.  I am mindful about which journal calls to me.  It has to feel ‘right’.  Then at the start of a new year, I sit in meditation and get really quiet.  My intention for the meditation is to find a word that will be embedded into my coming year.  Usually this has little thought and is a much more a heart-centered intention.  Most times I have no idea how ‘the word’ will show up, but upon review of my year it is sometimes startling to see just how it did.
  • Journaling can help to cultivate your dreams and vision for your life.  Simply writing down what it is you desire can help you to bring those ideas into fruition.  Similar to a vision board, a journal can be doodles, words, or pictures of the vision you have for yourself.