Embracing Wisdom

Life, food, wellness and love


Leave a comment

Falling Back

For as long as I have been a student of yoga, I have heard over and over about “leaning into” the pose, or life. While I understand the concept and ideas and often practice that way, I have recently decided that through life’s sometimes seemingly hard times one must also remember that there is the opposite force of leaning into, and that is “falling back”.

In the yoga world, this might be best described as abhyasa, or as I like to understand it as a consistent practice, or at its deepest a faith.  When I find myself questioning life, or particularly life challenges I am reminded to come back to my practice.  Not so much the physical practice, rather the spiritual and connective practice. The one that exists only when we have a strong sense of faith.  Whether that faith falls into a structured religious practice or more pagan approach that I tend to be drawn towards, it is a falling back.  It is a deep comfort knowing that no matter is showing up in my life (or in my pose), I have a sense of faith because I am consistently going back home to this time and time again.

I love the idea of embracing what is, or leaning into it, however, I have felt lately such a wonderful comfort in falling back into my faith, consistently, when life shows up. I see myself gently falling back into the loving arms of a wonderful source of love.

Are you leaning into life, or falling back?  Consider it.

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Meditation

For the beginning meditator, a great way to introduce the practice is to use mantra—a repeated word or phrase.  This form of meditation can allow the person to learn to focus on just one thing–the mantra–and quiet the noise of other thoughts. 

Sometimes referred to as Japa meditation, it is a beautiful thing to hold in your hands a beaded mala  and repeat the mantra as your finger slides over each bead. 108 times you will be repeating a word or phrase so be sure the mantra is positive, clear and concise. 

Some examples of mantra are:

  • I am
  • Om
  • I am love
  • I am health
  • Happiness surrounds me
  • I am worthy
  • Abundance is mine
  • Peace for all  

By starting out your day with mantra, you call into your life an awareness of what already exists in you. Try it and be amazed and the positive outcome you will have (and your furry meditating companion may also benefit). 

  


Leave a comment

Sacred Space

One of the most important things in cultivating a personal practice is to carve out the space within your home for yourself.  No forgotten toys, no unread mail, no clutter.  Truly a sacred space. Placing items that are special to you on a bookcase, alter, or even a breakfast tray is a great way to create the sacredness that will allow you to have a meaningful space to unroll the mat or come to stillness.

Turn an unused corner or area of your home into your space to connect with you.  Place items of meaning, books, and anything else that will be a reminder of the goodness that dwells within.  For me, I have rocks from a special place in nature, a mala that was made for me, candles to remind me of my inner flame, and a Ganesh (remover of obstacles).

What about you?

IMG_6480


1 Comment

Practice

I have come to learn that a practice can look like many things, not exclusive to Yoga postures, meditation or pranayama.  Rather, the practice can be in the form of steeping the first cup of tea, walking in the morning, preparing a wholesome meal or petting your furry friend.  Really a practice is anything that has the potential to become a mindful habit.

For me, I begin each day with a walk regardless of weather or commitments.  I choose to make the time to connect with nature and myself.  During the seasonal changes I find I am in most awe of my surroundings.  Witnessing the budding of leaves and the bright specks of color dabbled in a field is magnificent to the eye.  Each day that I mind fully walk there is more and more aliveness and more reminders of the moment.  This is practice.

How do you practice each day?

IMG_6187


Leave a comment

Opening to Yoga

So you have decided to take the Yoga class that you have been avoiding for months if not years. Consumed with doubt about your flexibility or unsure if the whole ‘quiet your mind’ is something you will find useful, new yogi’s typically dance around reasons as to why they cannot seem to make the time to unroll the mat for the first, or second time.  Often unsure about what to expect and perhaps even anxious about their bodies and its ability to bend, avoidance becomes the way. Daunted by images of people folded into unattainable and painful appearing postures, first time Yogi’s  generally head into the class with much trepidation. In truth, what often happens is that the discovery is much less about bending and way more about opening.

Consider this when you venture into your practice:

1. Show up. Choose a class and commit to go.  Show up.  Unroll your mat.  Arriving  on your mat is often the hardest.

2. Tell the truth. Your body can be your greatest teacher.  Listen to the ways in which your body speaks and be honest.  Avoid competing with others in the class simply to feed your ego.

3.  Let go of expectations. Set aside any goals and simply enjoy the experience.  Expectations are really premeditated disappointments so choose to leave them at the door. Instead, feel your body and feel your breath.

4. Be open to any outcome. An open heart and an open mind is the key that unlocks the door to personal peace. Whatever you experience on the mat is perfect.  Any outcome is perfect.  Be open.

The amazing thing is that each of those guidelines can be applied off the mat.  The practice becomes the way.

Namaste.